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Essays

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1 Amis, Martin Visiting Mrs. Nabokov and Other Excursions
New York Harmony 1994 0517597020 / 9780517597026 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good 
Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. In a collection of essays, the author of London Fields visits Salman Rushdie, observes the making of Robocop II, ruminates on the death of John Lennon, and covers the 1992 Republican convention. ; 8.30 X 5.60 X 0.60 inches; 274 pages 
Price: 5.88 USD
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2 Barth, John Further Fridays: Essays, Lectures, and Other Nonfiction, 1984-1994
Boston Little Brown & Co (T) 1995 0316083240 / 9780316083249 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good+ in Near Fine dust jacket 
Book Description Mylar and paper (Demco) protective cover. Dust jacket is intact with no nicks or tears. Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. An acclaimed author offers a witty collection of essays inspired by his Friday muse--the nonfiction one--and covers a variety of topics, from postmodern fiction and chaos theory to memory, imagination, and the arabesque. ; 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches; 377 pages; Ships within 24 hours. Great Customer Service, 100% Money Back Guaranteed. We aim to please. Please e-mail for questions. 
Price: 17.64 USD
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3 Bernikow, Louise Among Women
New York Harpercollins 1981 0060908785 / 9780060908782 Softcover Good+ 
Unmarked, mild wear on some corners or bumping. ; Book Description; Spine of the book has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. Louise Bernikow brings a poet's voice and a scholar's mind to the associations women forge among themselves: mother-daughter, sisters, friends, lovers, even enemies. By looking at women in history and literature, and the women in her own life, she illuminates a unique and very special bond. ; 8 X 5.30 X 0.70 inches; 296 pages 
Price: 10.31 USD
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4 Booker, Edna Lee Flight from China
New York Macmillan Pub Co 1946 First Edition (?); Second Printing Hardcover Fair with no dust jacket 
Wear on edges and corners. ; Book Description 1946 edition, reading copy, no dust cover, hardcover with stiff boards. ; B&W Illustrations; 236 pages; Ships within 24 hours. Great Customer Service, 100% Money Back Guaranteed. We aim to please. Please e-mail for questions. 
Price: 5.88 USD
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5 Brooks, Geraldine PEOPLE OF THE BOOK
US Viking 2008 0007177437 / 9780007177431 First Edition; Second Printing Hardcover Very Good+ in Near Fine dust jacket 
Some shelf wear on protective cover, but not on dust jacket. ; Book Description In 1996, Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, which has been rescued from Serb shelling during the Bosnian war. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna, a caustic loner with a passion for her work, discovers a series of tiny artifacts in its ancient binding-an insect wing fragment, wine stains, salt crystals, a white hair-she begins to unlock the book's mysteries. The reader is ushered into an exquisitely detailed and atmospheric past, tracing the book's journey from its salvation back to its creation. In Bosnia during World War II, a Muslim risks his life to protect it from the Nazis. In the hedonistic salons of fin-de-siècle Vienna, the book becomes a pawn in the struggle against the city's rising anti-Semitism. In inquisition-era Venice, a Catholic priest saves it from burning. In Barcelona in 1492, the scribe who wrote the text sees his family destroyed by the agonies of enforced exile. And in Seville in 1480, the reason for the Haggadah's extraordinary illuminations is finally disclosed. Hanna's investigation unexpectedly plunges her into the intrigues of fine art forgers and ultra-nationalist fanatics. Her experiences will test her belief in herself and the man she has come to love. Inspired by a true story, People of the Book is at once a novel of sweeping historical grandeur and intimate emotional intensity, an ambitious, electrifying work by an acclaimed and beloved author.; 9 x 6.4 x 1.4 inches; 372 pages; Ships within 24 hours. Great Customer Service, 100% Money Back Guaranteed. We aim to please. Please e-mail for questions.. 
Price: 5.88 USD
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6 Brown, Alan Audrey Hepburn's Neck: A Novel
New York Pocket Books 1996 0671526715 / 9780671526719 First Edition; Second Printing Hardcover Very Good+ in Very Good+ dust jacket 
Book Description: Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. Infatuated with actress Audrey Hepburn, young Toshi comes of age in Tokyo, where he tries to make a living while balancing family secrets, American friends and lovers, and his own burgeoning identity. ; 7.8 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches; 290 pages; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. 
Price: 5.88 USD
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7 Brown, Carrie Lamb in Love: A Novel
US Algonquin Books 1999 1565122038 / 9781565122031 Stated First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Good in Near Fine dust jacket 
Moisture damage on top of front and back pages. ; Book Description Mylar and paper (Demco) protective cover. Dust jacket is intact with no nicks or tears. Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and with wear and damage as noted. Carrie Brown's triumphant first novel, Rose's Garden, garnered high praise from the critics for its "simple, beautiful language," and for "plumbing the emotional depths of ordinary human beings." Just a year later, she does it again. ; 5.8 x 1.3 x 8.5 inches; 336 pages; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. 1565122038 
Price: 4.41 USD
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8 De Voto, Bernard A. Letters from the Earth
New York HarpPeren 1991 0060921056 / 9780060921057 Paperback Good+ 
Unmarked. Mild wear on some corners. ; Book Description; Spine of the book has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. If you're already familiar with Finn and Sawyer, perhaps this collection of fragments, short stories, and essays--assembled posthumously some few decades ago now, but still fresh--will enhance your sense of Twain's true range. A particular favorite: his essay "The Damned Human Race," wherein he proves, rather convincingly, that an anaconda snake is a higher form of life than an English Earl. ; Trade PB; 7.90 X 5 X 0.90 inches; 320 pages 
Price: 6.84 USD
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9 Eliot, T. S. To Criticize the Critic and Other Writings
Lincoln, Nebraska University of Nebraska Press 1992 0803267215 / 9780803267213 Paperback Very Good 
Unmarked. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. These influential essay and lectures by T. S. Eliot span nearly a half century--from 1917, when he published The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, to 1961, four years before his death. With the luminosity and clarity of a first-rate intellect, Eliot considers the uses of literary criticism, the writers who had the greatest influence on his own work, and the importance of being truly educated. Every thoughtful person who yearns to do more than simply get through the day will be reinforced by The Aims of Education. Other pieces include To Criticize the Critic, From Poe to Valéry, American Literature and the American Language, What Dante Means to Me, The Literature of Politics, The Classics and the Man of Letters, Ezra Pound: His Metric and Poetry, and Reflections on Vers Libre. Editorial Reviews Review "This volume covers almost the whole range of Eliot's development and at the same time gives us a revealing and moving sense of the man who told so much while remaining so reticent. ; Trade PB; 0.4 x 5.2 x 7.9 inches; 188 pages; Ships within 24 hours. Great Customer Service, 100% Money Back Guaranteed. We aim to please. Please e-mail for questions. 
Price: 4.90 USD
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10 Huxley, Aldous Literature and science
New York Harper & Row 1963 Stated First Edition Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 
Previous owner's signature on inside cover; otherwise unmarked. ; Book Description; Mylar and paper (Demco) protective cover. Dust jacket is intact with no nicks or tears. Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. Literature and Science is a 1963 book by Aldous Huxley. In these reflections on the relations between art and science, Aldous Huxley attempts to discern the similarities and differences implicit in scientific and literary language, and he offers his opinions on the influence that each discipline exerts upon the other. ; 22 cm.; 118 pages 
Price: 13.86 USD
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11 Huxley, Aldous On the Margin
London Chatto and Windus 1923 First Edition Hardcover Fair with no dust jacket 
Previous owner's name in pencil erased from inside cover; wear on corners and top and bottom of spine; otherwise unmarked. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 229 pages 
Price: 17.35 USD
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12 Huxley, Aldous The doors of Percpetion, Heaven and hell
New York Harper 1963 Paperback Good 
Unmarked, but wear on edges and corners. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear The Doors of Perception is a 1954 book by Aldous Huxley detailing his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley's recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon, and takes its title from a phrase in William Blake's poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the "purely aesthetic" to "sacramental vision". He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion. Background [edit] Mescaline is the principal agent of the psychedelic cactus peyote, which has been used in Native American religious ceremonies for thousands of years. A German pharmacologist, Arthur Heffter, isolated the alkaloids in the peyote cactus in 1891. These included mescaline, which he showed through a combination of animal and self-experiments was the compound responsible for the psychoactive properties of the plant. In 1919, Ernst Späth, another German chemist, synthesised the drug. Although personal accounts of taking the cactus had been written by psychologists such as Weir Mitchell in the US and Havelock Ellis in the UK during the 1890s, the German-American Heinrich Kluver was the first to systematically study its psychological effects in a small book called Mescal and Mechanisms of Hallucinations published in 1928. The book stated that the drug could be used to research the unconscious mind. In the 1930s, an American anthropologist Weston La Barre, published The Peyote Cult, the first study of the ritual use of peyote amongst the Huichol people of western Mexico. La Barre noted that the Indian users of the cactus took it to obtain visions for prophecy, healing and inner strength. Most psychiatric research projects into the drug in the 1930s and early 1940s tended to look at the role of the drug in mimicking psychosis. In 1947 however, the US Navy undertook Project Chatter, which examined the potential for the drug as a truth revealing agent. In the early 1950s, when Huxley wrote his book, mescaline was still regarded as a research chemical rather than a drug and was listed in the Parke-Davis catalogue with no controls. Huxley had been interested in spiritual matters and had used alternative therapies for some time. In 1936 he told TS Eliot that he was starting to meditate, and he used other therapies too; the Alexander Technique and the Bates Method of seeing had particular importance in guiding him through personal crises. In the late Thirties he had become interested in the spiritual teaching of Vedanta and in 1945 he published The Perennial Philosophy, which set out a philosophy that he believed was found amongst mystics of all religions. He had known for some time of visionary experience achieved by taking drugs in certain non-Christian religions. More specifically, Huxley had first heard of peyote use in ceremonies of the Native American Church in New Mexico soon after coming to the USA in 1937. [9] He first became aware of the cactus’s active ingredient, mescaline, after reading an academic paper written by Humphry Osmond, a British psychiatrist working at Weyburn Mental Hospital, Saskatchewan in early 1952. Osmond’s paper set out results from his research into schizophrenia using mescaline that he had been undertaking with colleagues, doctors Abram Hoffer and John Smythies. [10] In the epilogue to his novel The Devils of Loudon published earlier that year, Huxley had written that drugs were “toxic short cuts to self-transcendence”. [11] For the Canadian writer George Woodcock, Huxley had changed his opinion because mescaline was not addictive and appeared to be without unpleasant physical or mental side-effects, further he had found that hypnosis, autohypnosis and meditation had apparently failed to produce the results he wanted. [12] Close up of a peyote cactus growing in the wild. A peyote cactus, from which mescaline is derived. After reading Osmond’s paper, Huxley sent him a letter on 10 April 1952 expressing interest in the research and putting himself forward as an experimental subject. His letter explained his motivations as being rooted in an idea that the brain is a reducing valve that restricts consciousness and hoping mescaline may help access a greater degree of awareness, (an idea he later included in the book). [13] Reflecting on his stated motivations, Woodcock wrote that Huxley had realised the ways to enlightenment were many, and prayer and meditation were techniques among others. He hoped drugs might also break down the barriers of the ego, and both draw him closer to spiritual enlightenment and satisfy his quest as a seeker of knowledge. [14] In a second letter on 19 April, Huxley invited Osmond to stay while he was visiting Los Angeles to attend the American Psychiatric Association convention. [15] He also wrote that he looked forward to the mescaline experience and reassured Osmond that his doctor did not object to his taking it. [13] Huxley had invited his friend, the writer Gerald Heard to participate in the experiment; although Heard was too busy this time he did join him for a session in November of that year. [16] Composition and development [edit] Osmond arrived at Huxley’s house in West Hollywood on May 3, and recorded his impressions of the famous author as a tolerant and kind man, although he had expected otherwise. The psychiatrist had misgivings about giving the drug to Huxley, and wrote that "I did not relish the possibility, however remote, of being the man who drove Aldous Huxley mad," but instead found him an ideal subject. Huxley was “shrewd, matter-of-fact and to the point” and his wife Maria "eminently sensible". [17] Overall, they all liked each other, which was very important when administering the drug. The mescaline was slow to take effect, but Osmond saw that after two and a half hours the drug was working and after three hours Huxley was responding well. [18] The experience lasted eight hours and both Osmond and Maria remained with him throughout. [19] The experience started in Huxley's study before the party made a seven block trip to The Owl Drug (Rexall) store, known as World's Biggest Drugstore, at the corner of Beverly and La Cienega Boulevards. Huxley was particularly fond of the shop and the large variety of products available there, (in stark contrast to the much smaller selection in English chemist's shops). There he considered a variety of paintings in art books. For one of his friends, Huxley's poor eyesight manifested in both a great desire to see and a strong interest in painting, which influenced the strong visual and artistic nature of his experience. [20] After returning home to listen to music, eat, and walk in the garden, a friend drove the threesome to the hills overlooking the city. Photographs show Huxley standing, alternately arms on hips and outstretched with a grin on his face. Finally, they returned home and to ordinary consciousness. [21] One of Huxley’s friends who met him on the day said that despite writing about wearing flannel trousers, he was actually wearing blue jeans. Huxley admitted to having changed the fabric as Maria thought he should be better dressed for his readers. [22] Osmond later said he had a photo of the day that showed Huxley wearing flannels. [23] After Osmond’s departure, Huxley and Maria left to go on a three-week, 5,000-mile car trip around the national parks of the North West of the USA. After returning to Los Angeles, he took a month to write the book. [24] The Doors of Perception was the first book Huxley dedicated to his wife Maria. [25] Harold Raymond, at his publisher Chatto and Windus, said of the manuscript, “You are the most articulate guinea pig that any scientist could hope to engage. ”[23] The title was taken from William Blake's poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things through narrow chinks of his cavern. [26] Huxley had used Blake's metaphor in The Doors of Perception while discussing the paintings of Vermeer and the Nain brothers, and previously in The Perennial Philosophy, once in relation to the use of mortification as a means to remove persistent spiritual myopia and secondly to refer to the absence of separation in spiritual vision. [27] In the early 1950s, Huxley had suffered a debilitating attack of the eye condition Iritis. This increased his concern for his already poor eyesight and much of his work in the early part of the decade had featured metaphors of vision and sight. [28] Synopsis [edit] After a brief overview of research into mescaline, Huxley recounts that he was given 4/10 of a gram at 11: 00 am one day in May 1953. Huxley writes that he hoped to gain insight into extraordinary states of mind and expected to see brightly colored visionary landscapes. When he only sees lights and shapes, he puts this down to being a bad visualiser, however, he experiences a great change in his perception of the external world. [29] By 12: 30 pm, a vase of flowers becomes the "miracle, moment by moment, of naked existence". The experience, he asserts, is neither agreeable nor disagreeable, but simply "is". He likens it to Meister Eckhart's "istigheit" or "is-ness", and Plato's "Being" but not separated from "Becoming". He feels he understands the Hindu concept of Satchitananda, as well as the Zen koan that "the dharma body of the Buddha is in the hedge" and Buddhist suchness. In this state, Huxley explains he didn't have an "I", but instead a "not-I". Meaning and existence, pattern and colour become more significant than spatial relationships and time. Duration is replaced by a perpetual present. [30] Reflecting on the experience afterwards, Huxley finds himself in agreement with philosopher C. D. Broad that to enable us to live, the brain and nervous system eliminate unessential information from the totality of the Mind at Large. [31] Vermeer's The Milkmaid. The Milkmaid by Johannes Vermeer. "That mysterious artist was truly gifted with the vision that perceives the Dharma-Body as the hedge at the bottom of the garden", reflected Huxley. In summary, Huxley writes that the ability to think straight is not reduced while under the influence of mescaline, visual impressions are intensified, and the human experimenter will see no reason for action because the experience is so fascinating. [32] Temporarily leaving the chronological flow, he mentions that four or five hours into the experience he was taken to the World's Biggest Drug Store (WBDS) , where he was presented with books on art. In one book, the dress in Botticelli's Judith provokes a reflection on drapery as a major artistic theme as it allows painters to include the abstract in representational art, to create mood, and also to represent the mystery of pure being. [33] Huxley feels that human affairs are somewhat irrelevant whilst on mescaline and attempts to shed light on this by reflecting on paintings featuring people. [34] Cézanne's Self-portrait with a straw hat seems to him as incredibly pretentious, while Vermeer's human still lives (also, the Le Nain brothers and Vuillard) are the nearest to reflecting this not-self state. [35] For Huxley, the reconciliation of these cleansed perceptions with humanity reflects the age old debate between active and contemplative life, known as the way of Martha and the way of Mary. As Huxley believes that contemplation should also include action and charity, he concludes that the experience represents contemplation at its height, but not its fullness. Correct behaviour and alertness are needed. Nonetheless, Huxley maintains that even quietistic contemplation has an ethical value, because it is concerned with negative virtues and acts to channel the transcendent into the world. [36] Red Hot Poker or Kniphofia flowers. The Red Hot Poker flowers in Huxley's garden were "so passionately alive that they seemed to be standing on the very brink of utterance". After listening to Mozart's C-Minor Piano Concerto, Gesualdo's madrigals and Alban Berg's Lyric Suite, [37] Huxley heads into the garden. Outside, the garden chairs take on such an immense intensity that he fears being overwhelmed; this gives him an insight into madness. He reflects that spiritual literature, including the works of Jakob Böhme, William Law and the Tibetan Book of the Dead, talk of these pains and terrors. Huxley speculates that schizophrenia is the inability to escape from this reality into the world of common sense and thus help would be essential. [38] After lunch and the drive to the WBDS he returns home and to his ordinary state of mind. His final insight is taken from Buddhist scripture: that within sameness there is difference, although that difference is not different from sameness. [39] The book finishes with Huxley's final reflections on the meaning of his experience. Firstly, the urge to transcend one's self is universal through times and cultures (and was characterized by H. G. Wells as The Door in the Wall). [40] He reasons that better, healthier "doors" are needed than alcohol and tobacco. Mescaline has the advantage of not provoking violence in takers, but its effects last an inconveniently long time and some users can have negative reactions. Ideally, self-transcendence would be found in religion, but Huxley feels that it is unlikely that this will ever happen. Christianity and mescaline seem well-suited for each other; the Native American Church for instance uses the drug as a sacrament, where its use combines religious feeling with decorum. [41] Huxley concludes that mescaline is not enlightenment or the Beatific Vision, but a 'gratuitous grace' (a term taken from Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica). [42] It is not necessary but helpful, especially so for the intellectual, who can become the victim of words and symbols. Although systematic reasoning is important, direct perception has intrinsic value too. Finally, Huxley maintains that the person who has this experience will be transformed for the better. Reception [edit] The book met with a variety of responses, both positive and negative, [15] from writers in the field of literature, psychiatry, philosophy and religion. These included a symposium published in The Saturday Review magazine with the unlikely title of, Mescalin – An Answer to Cigarettes, including contributions from Huxley; J. S. Slotkin, a professor of Anthropology; and a physician, Dr. W. C. Cutting. [43] For the Scottish poet, Edwin Muir “Mr. Huxley’s experiment is extraordinary, and is beautifully described”. [44] Thomas Mann, the author and friend of Huxley, believed the book demonstrated Huxley's escapism. He thought that while escapism found in mysticism might be honorable, drugs were not. Huxley's 'aesthetic self-indulgence' and indifference to humanity would lead to suffering or stupidity, and he concluded the book was irresponsible, if not quite immoral, to encourage young people to try the drug. [45] For Huxley’s biographer and friend, the author Sybille Bedford, the book combined sincerity with simplicity, passion with detachment. [46] “It reflects the heart and mind open to meet the given, ready, even longing, to accept the wonderful. The Doors is a quiet book. It is also one that postulates a goodwill – the choice once more of the nobler hypothesis. It turned out, for certain temperaments, a seductive book. ”[47] For biographer David King Dunaway, The Doors of Perception, along with The Art of Seeing, can be seen as the closest Huxley ever came to autobiographical writing. [48] Psychiatric responses included those of William Sargant, the controversial British psychiatrist, who reviewed the book for The British Medical Journal and particularly focused on Huxley's reflections on schizophrenia. He wrote that the book brought to life the mental suffering of schizophrenics, which should make psychiatrists uneasy about their failure to relieve this. Also, he hoped that the book would encourage the investigation of the physiological, rather than psychological, aspects of psychiatry. [49] Other medical researchers questioned the validity of Huxley's account. The book contained "99 percent Aldous Huxley and only one half gram mescaline" according to Ronald Fisher. [50] While Joost A. M. Meerloo found Huxley's reactions "not necessarily the same as... Other people's experiences." [51] For Steven J. Novak, The Doors Of Perception (and Heaven and Hell) redefined taking mescaline (and LSD, although Huxley had not taken it until after he had written both books) as a mystical experience with possible psychotherapeutic benefits, where physicians had previously thought of the drug in terms of mimicking a psychotic episode, known as psychotomimetic. [52] The popularity of the book also affected research into these drugs, because researchers needed a random sample of subjects with no preconceptions about the drug in order to conduct experiments, and these became very difficult to find. [53] In the field of religion, Huxley’s friend and spiritual mentor, the Vedantic monk Swami Prabhavananda, thought that mescaline was an illegitimate path to enlightenment, a "deadly heresy" as Christopher Isherwood put it. [23] Martin Buber, the Jewish religious philosopher, attacked Huxley's notion that mescaline allowed a person to participate in "common being", and held that the drug ushered users "merely into a strictly private sphere". Philosophically, Buber believed the drug experiences to be holidays "from the person participating in the community of logos and cosmos—holidays from the very uncomfortable reminder to verify oneself as such a person." For Buber man must master, withstand and alter his situation, or even leave it, "but the fugitive flight out of the claim of the situation into situationlessness is no legitimate affair of man." ; Trade PB; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 185 pages 
Price: 11.90 USD
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13 Kingsolver, Barbara Small Wonder: Essays
US Harper 2002 0060504072 / 9780060504076 First Edition Hardcover Very Good+ in Near Fine dust jacket 
Unmarked. ; Book Description; Mylar and paper (Demco) protective cover. Dust jacket is intact with no nicks or tears. Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are shiny, square and without wear. In her new essay collection, the beloved author of High Tide in Tucson brings to us out of one of history's darker moments an extended love song to the world we still have. From its opening parable gleaned from recent news about a lost child saved in an astonishing way, the book moves on to consider a world of surprising and hopeful prospects, ranging from an inventive conservation scheme in a remote jungle to the backyard flock of chickens tended by the author's small daughter. Whether she is contemplating the Grand Canyon, her vegetable garden, motherhood, adolescence, genetic engineering, TV-watching, the history of civil rights, or the future of a nation founded on the best of all human impulses, these essays are grounded in the author's belief that our largest problems have grown from the earth's remotest corners as well as our own backyards, and that answers may lie in those places, too. In the voice Kingsolver's readers have come to rely on-sometimes grave, occasionally hilarious, and ultimately persuasive-Small Wonder is a hopeful examination of the people we seem to be, and what we might yet make of ourselves. ; 8.6 x 5.7 x 1 inches; 267 pages 
Price: 9.80 USD
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14 Lawrence, Sagar, Keith The Art of D. H. Lawrence
Cambridge Cambridge University Press 1976 0521093872 / 9780521093873 Paperback Very Good- 
Unmarked. Some sun staining on edges of back cover. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. In this comprehensive study of D. H. Lawrence's major works, originally published in paperback in 1975, Keith Sagar traces the development of Lawrence's vision and the 'appropriate form' which that vision found at different periods of his life. Dr Sagar sees Lawrence's creative life as falling into four distinct phases: a period of gradual discovery and growth; a period of mature achievement; a phase of moral and artistic uncertainty, even desperation; and a regeneration to a new art and vision. The elaboration and testing of this division, based on close and penetrating analyses of the chosen works, produced what was perhaps the most coherent account of Lawrence's art yet written. Each chapter begins with a full chronology, dating the works of the years in question in order of composition, and there is an extensive bibliography. ; 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches; 266 pages 
Price: 11.76 USD
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15 McPhee, John La Place de la Concorde Suisse
New York Farrar, Straus and Giroux 1994 0374519323 / 9780374519322 Second Edition 18670Paperback Very Good 
Unmarked. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. Anyone who has ever traveled in Switzerland cannot help but to have remarked upon the overwhelming tranquility of the country. But this tranquility is illusory. As John McPhee writes in La Place de la Concorde Suisse, a rich journalistic study of the Swiss Army's role in Swiss society, "there is scarcely a scene in Switzerland that is not ready to erupt in fire to repel an invasive war." With a population smaller than New Jersey's, Switzerland has a standing army of 650,000 ready to be mobilized in less than 48 hours. The Swiss Army, known in this country chiefly for its little red pocketknives, is so quietly efficient at the arts of war that the Israelis carefully patterned their own military on the Swiss model. You'll understand why after reading this outstanding book ; Trade PB; 8.20 X 5.40 X 0.50 inches; 160 pages 
Price: 7.73 USD
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16 Miller, Henry Stand Still Like the Hummingbird
New York New Directions 1962 0811203220 / 9780811203227 Fourth Printing Paperback Good 
Unmarked, but wear on corners and some edges. Mild crease on front top corner. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. One of Henry Miller's most luminous statements of his personal philosophy of life, Stand Still Like the Hummingbird, provides a symbolic title for this collection of stories and essays. Many of them have appeared only in foreign magazines while others were printed in limited editions which have gone out of print. ; New Directions Paperbook; 7.90 X 5 X 0.60 inches; 196 pages 
Price: 7.66 USD
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17 More, Sir Thomas Utopia
Great Britian Wordsworth Editions Ltd 1998 1853264741 / 9781853264740 Softcover Good 
Unmarked. Mild wear on some corners and price sticker on back cover. Some rubbingon front cover. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square with minor wear. Ships Safe and Fast. More's 'Utopia' is a complex, innovative and penetrating contribution to political thought, culminating in the famous 'description' of the Utopians, who live according to the principles of natural law, but are receptive to Christian teachings, who hold all possessions in common, and view gold as worthless. ; Wordsworth Classics of World Literature; 7.72 X 4.96 X 0.47 inches; 160 pages 
Price: 3.92 USD
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18 Rushdie, Salman Imaginary Homelands Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
Granta Books London 1991 Softcover Very Good 
Unmarked. Mild wear on some corners. Book has appearance of light use with no easily noticeable wear. ; Book Description; Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square with minor wear. Ships Safe and Fast. ; Trade PB; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 432 pages 
Price: 4.41 USD
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19 Smiley, Jane 13 Ways of Looking at the Novel
New York Knopf 2005 1400040590 / 9781400040599 Stated First Edition Hardcover Very Good+ in Very Good+ dust jacket 
Unmarked. ; Book Description; Mylar and paper (Demco) protective cover. Dust jacket is intact with no nicks or tears. Spine has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and without wear. Over an extraordinary twenty-year career, Jane Smiley has written all kinds of novels: mystery, comedy, historical fiction, epic. "Is there anything Jane Smiley cannot do?" raves Time magazine. But in the wake of 9/11, Smiley faltered in her hitherto unflagging impulse to write and decided to approach novels from a different angle: she read one hundred of them, from classics such as the thousand-year-old Tale of Genji to recent fiction by Zadie Smith, Nicholson Baker, and Alice Munro. Smiley explores-as no novelist has before her-the unparalleled intimacy of reading, why a novel succeeds (or doesn't) , and how the novel has changed over time. She describes a novelist as "right on the cusp between someone who knows everything and someone who knows nothing," yet whose "job and ambition is to develop a theory of how it feels to be alive." In her inimitable style-exuberant, candid, opinionated-Smiley invites us behind the scenes of novel-writing, sharing her own habits and spilling the secrets of her craft. She walks us step-by-step through the publication of her most recent novel, Good Faith, and, in two vital chapters on how to write "a novel of your own," offers priceless advice to aspiring authors. Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel may amount to a peculiar form of autobiography. We see Smiley reading in bed with a chocolate bar; mulling over plot twists while cooking dinner for her family; even, at the age of twelve, devouring Sherlock Holmes mysteries, which she later realized were among her earliest literary models for plot and character. And in an exhilarating conclusion, Smiley considers individually the one hundred books she read, from Don Quixote to Lolita to Atonement, presenting her own insights and often controversial opinions. In its scope and gleeful eclecticism, her reading list is one of the most compelling-and surprising-ever assembled. Engaging, wise, sometimes irreverent, Thirteen Ways is essential reading for anyone who has ever escaped into the pages of a novel or, for that matter, wanted to write one. ; 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.9 inches; 591 pages 
Price: 10.78 USD
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20 Strormer, John A., None Dare Call it Treason
Flourissant, Missouri Liberty Bell Press 1964 0914053116 / 9780914053118 Mass Market Paperback Good+ 
Unmarked, mild wear on corners and small creas in lower right hand corner cover. ; Book Description; Spine of the book has no signs of creasing. Pages are clean and not marred by notes or folds. Covers are square and with minor wear. Political Science, Political Studies, Sociology, Ameican Studies; 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.7 inches; 254 pages 
Price: 5.88 USD
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